Four Steps for Boosting Your Late-Season Performance

News & Results

08/7/2004| 0 comments
by Chris Carmichael

Four Steps for Boosting Your Late-Season Performance

With a healthy dose of planning and attention to detail you can kickstart the second half of your season.

off later in the season. Rather than just going out and riding long hours at a moderate pace, increase the impact of two to three hour rides by adding Tempo workouts during your weekday training sessions. During a Tempo interval, your cadence should be relatively low (70-75 rpm), your power should be relatively high (about 20% below your 10-minute maximum sustainable power), and you should hold that power and cadence steady for the entire interval.

 

A Category 3 or Masters racer should accumulate about 120-150 minutes of Tempo during the first week of this two-week period, though that doesn?t mean you should try to complete all of it in one ride. You?re better off completing one 40- to 50-minute Tempo Interval during two- to three-hour long endurance rides on each of three training days (3 x 40 = 120). It?s even all right to do Tempo workouts on back-to-back days, although you should be prepared for your heart rate, but not power, to be slightly (3-6 beats) depressed from fatigue during the second day?s workout. Cat 4-5 racers should accumulate 75-120 minutes of Tempo, and Cat 1-2 racers should get in 180-210 minutes. The sample weeks below illustrate two ways a Cat 3 or Masters rider might structure the first week of this brief training period.

 

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest Day

<?xml:namespace prefix = st1 /?> EnduranceMiles

40 min Tempo

Endurance Miles

EnduranceMiles

40 min Tempo

RecoveryMiles

EnduranceMiles

40 min Tempo

Endurance Miles

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest Day

EnduranceMiles

40 min Tempo

EnduranceMiles

40 min Tempo

RecoveryMiles

Endurance Miles

EnduranceMiles

40 min Tempo

Endurance Miles

 

3.     

 

 

 

 

3. Ride SteadyState for One Week

During the Foundation and Preparation Periods in the winter and spring, you did long blocks of Tempo training before moving on to the shorter and harder intervals in SteadyState workouts. At this point of the year, we?re moving from one to the other more quickly because you don?t need a great deal of stimulus to provide the boost your aerobic engine needs.

 

Your training schedule during the second week of your mid-season tune-up may look very similar to the first week, except the Tempo workouts should be replaced by SteadyState Intervals. These intervals are shorter (10-20 minutes), and they?re usually arranged into a set of three intervals separated by 10-15 minutes of active recovery. The intensity level is increased from Tempo to about 10% below your 10-minute maximum sustainable power output. You?re going to be riding hard during the intervals, but not quite as hard as time trial pace. Riding close to, but below your lactate threshold (LT) power output means you?re applying a huge load to your aerobic engine without causing the additional fatigue that comes from training above LT. This is especially important because you want to be fresh enough to have a high quality SteadyState workout at the end of the week.

 

Category 3 and Masters

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